Master Craftsman

Canvas Embroidery

Rosie

Hanukah Still Life


Judging criteria:Technique, canvas coverage, color, design, overall appearance, and ability to follow directions.
Step 1.Choice of ten stitches used in one of three provided designs with a monochromatic color scheme.
Step 2.Twenty-one different stitches used in a provided design with an analogous color scheme.
Step 3.An original design or one of the stitcher’s choice using four diaper patterns and worked in a split-complementary color scheme.
Step 4.Eight Florentine patterns used in an original design or one of the stitcher’s choosing.
Step 5.Two appliqués of one size canvas to another used in an original design or one of the stitcher’s choosing.
Step 6.This piece must demonstrate Master Craftsman ability. It requires an original design incorporating a variety of threads, stitches, and techniques.



Master Craftsman

Design Gallery

Artist's Inspiration

Jacqueline Jacobs

Magnolia Chapter
(formerly of Millwood)r

Rosie

(click on picture for a larger view)
Rosie
10 1/4" x 14 1/4"
1994

"My husband and I took a trip to Egypt, and while there I had the opportunity to ride Rosie while visiting some pyramids."

The man and pyramid were worked on congress canvas, then appliqued on 18 count canvas. A variety of stitches were used in the project.

Photograph copyright © 2005 by Jacqueline Jacobs. Published with permission.


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Master Craftsman

Design Gallery

Artist's Inspiration

Gail Stafford
Tar River Chapter

Hanukah Still Life

(click on picture for a larger view)
Tar River Trail

2005

"For years I have observed with pleasure the way the Hanukah menorah creates a reflection in my kitchen window. My family eats dinner there and the menorah is lit before we eat so we can watch the candles burn during dinner."

"Hanukah Still Life" is Gail's original design in fulfillment of Step 6 of the Master Craftsman in Canvas Embroidery program, and represents about a year and half of work from inspiration to finish. She began work on the masters program about 5 years ago. Here is what Gail said about her experiences.

"I am satisfied, and pleased, with my achievement.

"Other than completing Step 6 and finding out that I had achieved Master Craftsman, I most enjoyed the stitching, and when things came together the way I hoped. Sometimes this occurred only after several unsuccessful attempts. I also enjoyed stitching on my doodle canvas and trying out different colors and stitches before trying them on a piece.

"My least favorite part was deciding on an idea, and making a plan was difficult. Creating an original design was a very painful process.

"Some of you might want to know that one learns from participating in the program despite the fact that this is a testing program. For example, I was not familiar with diaper patterns prior to the program and had to do a lot of research in this area. Also, I had never done canvas appliqué prior to this experience and I had to read about it and practice it. I also practiced couching and asked a friend for lessons after several unsuccessful attempts on practice canvas.

"One other item that might interest others is the provisional pass I earned on my step 2 and step 6 pieces. This was particularly disappointing at the step 6 level since one should have a good grasp of the standards by this point in the program. Thinking about this from the judges’ perspective, I recognize that the piece to earn Master Craftsman certification has to be just right. The good news is that I persevered and corrected the perspective on my gift box to the satisfaction of the judges and have now earned the title of Master Craftsman in Canvas Embroidery."

About the design:

"Hanukah Still Life" is stitched primarily with stranded embroidery cotton, including variegated browns and tans, the piece also includes red and gold Balger braid, DMC metallic gold, and Balger blending filament. Some accents were stitched in silk and wool blends (Impressions and Silk and Ivory), Persian wool, Medici wool, silk, nylon and polyester blend (Petite Frosty Rays), and Wonder Twist.

The dark night background is stitched in irregular Byzantine. It was quite a challenge to start and stop the stitching to go around the menorah, candles and reflection and keep the pattern in line. A simple Florentine pattern was used for the candles, the flames and the base of the menorah. The reflected candles were stitched in mosaic and the reflected menorah is stitched in tent stitch, as is the reflected package. The dreidel is stitched in diagonal tent stitch.

The table and its reflection are composed of cross stitches using a variegated thread and making the crosses one at a time as you stitch. The muttons were stitched in Gobelin with a line of tent stitch along the edge. The larger package was stitched in Hungarian and the ribbon and bow was stitched in cashmere. The gelt (coins) are stitched in diagonal mosaic with a couched thread at the rim. The arms of the menorah were made up of three “rows” of 12 ply metallic thread each that were couched to the canvas. The candle cups are an invented stitch that is a variation of stitches by Jean Hilton.

Text and photograph copyright © 2005 by Gail Stafford. Published with permission.


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